The Blessed Latin One
sherlock-in-heels:

Atlin says: Holy fuck Catalyst, warn a woman when you are going to brighten her dash with pornography.
(And maybe she’ll warn you next time when she’s going to besmirch yours with swearing.)
shoe: Francesco Russo

sherlock-in-heels:

Atlin says: Holy fuck Catalyst, warn a woman when you are going to brighten her dash with pornography.

(And maybe she’ll warn you next time when she’s going to besmirch yours with swearing.)

shoe: Francesco Russo

johnsconsultingboyfriend:

THE EYE CONTACT

Look at it.

Moriarty has to, HAS TO, slip out of character for just a second to send that sly look at Sherlock.

That ‘watch as I destroy your world’ look.

And Sherlock… Sherlock, for just a moment has that appreciation for Jim’s genius. He saw what Moriarty was doing and admired the flawlessness of it.

karin-woywod:

luciawestwick:

The Imitation Game - Official UK Teaser Trailer (x)

[ Karin says : ]          Mhhhyes, I  thought  this would be the first gifs to emerge from that teaser trailer …

"Sometimes it is the people who no one imagines anything of who can do the things that no one can imagine." x

On my BBC Mini-Series Wishlist:  Loo Brealey as Mildred Lathbury in an adaptation of Barbara Pym’s Excellent Women 

On my BBC Mini-Series Wishlist:  Loo Brealey as Mildred Lathbury in an adaptation of Barbara Pym’s Excellent Women 

bakerstreetbadwolf:

Louise Brealey as Eleanor Knight in BBC Father Brown (2013).

Re-watched Little Favour last night—still intense.

Re-watched Little Favour last night—still intense.

Hi, just wondering what your take is on that famous Mycroft quote: 'My brother has the brain of a philosopher or a scientist, yet elects to be a detective. What might we deduce about his heart?' – what do you deduce, Ivy?

ivyblossom:

The easy answer is that Sherlock tells us why he’s a detective: it’s a replacement addiction. Either he solves crimes, or he gets high. Apparently being a scientist or a philosopher wouldn’t provide the same kind of high. There it is! Done and dusted, right? Should we believe him?

Much like his creators, Sherlock lies. He lies to project an image of himself that he tries to embody, even through it really doesn’t fit. So perhaps we shouldn’t take his explanations of his own choices at face value.

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fro14:

deidrichenstein:

[puts head in hands] I just watched this episode again for the first time in…quite a while and it’s so beautiful I think I’m going to die. It’s the best one. It’s my favourite. Sherlock and Irene are the most beautiful and whimsical mirror in the whole show, they haven’t written a better one before or since, like, it’s so poignant it makes me want to cry and laugh at the same time. A very large part of why I’ve become so attached to this show and enjoy collusion with the subtext so much is because it not only illustrates, but celebrates gayness with that other most culturally reviled object: womanhood. And the reason this is so wonderful is because the rejection of both gayness and womanhood stem from the same noxious root; misogyny. One finds expression in the other and vice versa, and the expression is genuine. It’d be so easy for a story like this to fall into misogynist traps, whether outright or internalised, but it doesn’t, which is such a delight. While I do find shows/films that deal head on with misogyny very important and in many cases cathartic [The Piano Teacher being the all time best], it also becomes exhausting and depressing. So finding something that genuinely subverts these ideas, that is funny and warm and gentle and soft, a story about two men that is erotic, utterly feminine and bereft of toxic masculinity is like being TOUCHED BY THE ANGELS.

Irene is THE mirror for Sherlock’s sexuality. There are other mirrors directly about that, namely The Golem, The Hound and Moriarty, but they are about fear and repression; they are monstrous disfigurements (fear and stimulus). Irene is not. And the reason A Scandal in Belgravia is so wistful and achy and absolutely fraught is not because there is any sudden romance between Sherlock and Irene in the surface narrative, it’s because in that whimsical layer just below, Irene is his hidden desire and longing. Put plainly out in the open for all the world to see, in her form; a woman. You can literally watch the whole episode thinking of Irene as a kind of faerie and it’s one of the most PRECIOUS THINGS I’ve ever seen.

And sldjkfmlj they are the most beautifully gender bent versions of each other; same blue eyes, high cheekbones, curly brown hair (and she wears hers like he keeps his), wiry figures. THEY’RE GORGEOUS.

I’m gonna be the biggest bag of trash when I write about this episode.

ASIB is my favorite as well! I would be interested in hearing more detail about how the Golem, the Hound and Moriary mirror Sherlock’s sexuality!